Block title

Works completed in 2016

This refers to the first 3 images in this gallery.
"Sea Level Rise" was included the show Vanishing Beauty at the Portsmouth Art & Cultural Center in Portsmouth, VA.
I had been thinking of stacking the toilets bowl for awhile, as I kicked the idea around there was something about the Burgher of Calais that kept pushing into my consciousness. I stilled don’t know the connection but trust more and more in listening to what I realize is my intuition. I did a few rough sketches and started to keep my eyes open for discarded white toilet.
Then I was asked to be part of a show on sea level rise and I felt that the tower could fold into the theme. The curator and I discussed it and she like the concept and the elegant form the bowls stacked one on top of another created. (I sent her images of 3 bowls stack up to give her an idea of how the final piece would look).
I’m planning to have the bowl translated into cast iron, so the bowl are more durable and can be cantilevered in ways that might elude to the Burghers of Calais.

The next four images are from the piece call "The Basic Shapes of Nature"

  • Sea Level Rise, ( 1st study for the Burghers of Calais)

    not yet
    From show at Court Yard Gallery in Portsmouth, VA I had been thinking of stacking the toilets bowl for awhile, as I kicked the idea around there was something about the Burgher of Calais that kept pushing into my consciousness. I stilled don’t know the connection but trust more and more in listening to what I realize is my intuition. I did a few rough sketches and started to keep my eyes open for discarded white toilet. Then I was asked to be part of a show on sea level rise and I felt that the tower could fold into the theme.
  • Sea Level Rise, ( 1st study for the Burghers of Calais)

    I had been thinking of stacking the toilets bowl for awhile, as I kicked the idea around there was something about the Burgher of Calais that kept pushing into my consciousness. I stilled don’t know the connection but trust more and more in listening to what I realize is my intuition. I did a few rough sketches and started to keep my eyes open for discarded white toilet. Then I was asked to be part of a show on sea level rise and I felt that the tower could fold into the theme.
  • Sea Level Rise, ( 1st study for the Burghers of Calais)

    I had been thinking of stacking the toilets bowl for awhile, as I kicked the idea around there was something about the Burgher of Calais that kept pushing into my consciousness. I stilled don’t know the connection but trust more and more in listening to what I realize is my intuition. I did a few rough sketches and started to keep my eyes open for discarded white toilet. Then I was asked to be part of a show on sea level rise and I felt that the tower could fold into the theme.
  • Basic Shapes of Nature

    Hollow beech tree truck with cork nailed to the outer surface.
  • Basics Shapes of Nature - Interior

    Hollow beech tree truck with cork nailed to the outer surface.
  • Basics Shapes of Nature (detail #1)

    Hollow beech tree truck with cork nailed to the outer surface.
  • Basics Shapes of Nature (detail #2)

    Hollow beech tree truck with cork nailed to the outer surface.
  • There's Always an Horizon

    This is wall wall pieces that measures 26"h. x 13"w. x 2"d. It;s made from the 4 legs of 1950's armed swivel office chair. They are oak. I took the whole chair apart and already one metal part in another piece. I joined the to pairs of leg then joined the two pairs together. Simple beauty is all around us if we choose to slow down and take it in.

Work for Baltimore Art Museum Show (fall 2015) and beyond.

A variety of new or rework pieces curated into Baker Artist Winner show at BMA and three other new pieces from 2016.

  • Copper Stump Mandala

    I've been working on this piece off and on for over 15 years. It wasn't till this spring that I combined it with this 19th century iron wagon wheel rim that I finally knew it was done. The ring of iron contained and helped to to give the work parameters. I am now satisfied that this is starting to hum.
  • Copper Stump Mandala (angled view)

    I've been working on this piece off and on for over 15 years. It wasn't till this spring that I combined it with this 19th century iron wagon wheel rim that I finally knew it was done. The ring of iron contained and helped to to give the work parameters. I am now satisfied that this is starting to hum.
  • My Line Is Old #2

    This is an old fire hose coiled up and squeezed into an old window frame. On the back side of the frame is 3/8" galvanized rat wire, also know as hardware clothe. This give the piece a completely different feeling from one side to the next. The frame came as you see it. I only coiled and forced the hose in side to create this relationship. For me this speaks to be trapped.
  • My Line Is Old #2 ( 3 different views)

    This is an old fire hose coiled up and squeezed into an old window frame. On the back side of the frame is 3/8" galvanized rat wire, also know as hardware clothe. This give the piece a completely different feeling from one side to the next. The frame came as you see it. I only coiled and forced the hose in side to create this relationship. For me this speaks to be trapped.
  • Every Body Has A Well

    This is another of those piece I starter 5 years ago or so, but it just never felt right to me each time I showed it. The proportions just weren't working for me, so in the summer of 2015 I made it a foot taller and changed the way I handled the ends. The title refers to finding that place where we feel centered, where we can recharge and feel safe.
  • Gravity Does Not Discriminate (detail)

    Hanging cluster of old nails held to recycled stereo speaker magnet. What holds us together?
  • Gravity Does Not Discriminate

    Hanging cluster of old nails held to recycled stereo speaker magnet. What holds us together?

Keys

I've been collecting old keys for years. I believe that they hold ontol a kind of history. When I went through a long period being il,l I struggled with how to keep working. I was forced to work small and create pieces where many small steps could evetually add up to something more.

  • Yes!

    5" x 5" x 5" old brass keys
  • The Egg Within

    On one level, these egg forms I started making a few years ago, were part of a sense of rebirth I had. These keys were first annealed, then soldered over a carved wooden form, which eventually was completely burned into a smaller form. old brass keys & wood 13" x 9" x 9"
  • Change Can Be Easy (detail)

    Often I've just been making a reflection of the Earth. This partial dome has a small opening at the apex to allow room for growth creativity and breath. old brass keys 10" x 26" x 26"
  • Change Be Can Easy

    Often I've just been making a reflection of the Earth. This partial dome has a small opening at the apex to allow room for growth creativity and breath. old brass keys 10" x 26" x 26"
  • Wye Keys

    These little chunks of wood came from the Wye Oak in Wye Mill, Maryland. It was the oldest white oak in America. When it fell in 2002, this ancient tree was estimated to be 460 years old. The acorn that sprouted into the Wye Oak would have done so about the same time Michelangelo was finishing The Last Judgement in the Sistine Chapel. I feel this wood is part of the sacred heritage of this land. By binding a key to these small pieces of the oak, I've created a relationship. The Wye Oak represents the last 460 years.
  • The Shroud (detail of burnt wood crotch)

    old brass keys & wood 90" x 60" x 10"
  • The Shroud (detail of crotch)

    old brass keys & wood, 90" x 60" x 10"
  • The Shroud

    old brass keys & wood, 90" x 60" x 10" This is the last of the long term projects I started and stopped many times in a 4 year period while recovering from health issues. The keys were shaped and fitted over this locust tree Y, then carefully soldered together to mirror and protect the surface in their own way. The keys shade and become a shodow of this piece of nature (the tree), while they also are able to stand alone if they need to. The tree, when inverted, is two grounding forces merging into one.
  • You're The Key (detail)

    I punched the word HOPE into each of these keys before soldering them into this sphere. We need more hope in this world we've created. old brass keys 5" x 5" x 5"
  • You're The Key

    I punched the word HOPE into each of these keys before soldering them into this sphere. We need more hope in this world we've created. old brass keys 5" x 5" x 5"

Works With And From Trees

Looking for answers in the woods.

  • Mandala

    32'x 30'x 30' (not counting the tree), wood This was one of a group of installations I did in the early 90's using twenty eight 28' to 32' locust tree poles off of my land. These poles were used in each installation. In making the piece, I worked with the Park Service to assure them that the 1 year installation would not harm the 150 year old southern red oak. A good friend and I spent a day climbing and hoisting the poles into the tree. We spent hours arranging and weaving the poles into position.
  • Council Elders

    wood & copper, 7'x 4'x 4'
  • Who's Holding Who

    wood, 7' x 3' x 1' These are 3 young ash trees Y turned upside down, then stacked one on top of the other with smallest at the bottom supporting the other two larger pieces. Carrying them through life.
  • The Wall

    wood, 6'x4'x6'
  • Where's Your Forest?

    5"x 2'x 2' , wood This is the first of the chiseled cedar tree groupings. This was a winter piece. A time when we pull in to reflect and prepare for the coming season.
  • 500 Year Old Tree #3

    wood (cedar) & steel 4' x 28" x 28" I chiseled down to the heartwood on many snow fallen cedar trees stopping to create a gentle curve running through the forest of heartwood. This is one of the many pieces I've created over the years where I'm searching for a way to create a 500 year old tree, which of course cannot be done. That's the point. We may be able to do many new and amazing things, but if we screw up the environment will there be more healthy 500 year old trees for future generations to marvel at?
  • Helped Me With The Fall

    7'x 2'x 4', wood This is another in the chiseled cedars series. I had just started working on this piece on September 11th. 2001. The chiseling did help me through that and the following days. The events of that day caused so many thoughts and ideas that eventually I set this piece aside to work on other new projects, but this piece was always in my consciousness. Over ten years, as different cedar trees found their way into my possession (heavy snows are good for that), I slowly worked this sculpture into completion.
  • Old Habits Can Become Second Nature

    6'x 9'x 3', wood & old steel shovel heads This is another piece from the "Digging Our Own Graves" series. In this evolution I've created an old tool hanger for 3 of the shovels. An old slab of the outer piece of a milled cherry tree from my childhood home is used as the main support. Then I mounted into this 3 small Y-shaped limbs for the shovel trees to hang from. It has become an old habit to not think about how certain actions are hurting our environment.
  • Forest Wheel #3

    wood, tracter tire sidewall, & stainless steel bolts 3'x 3'x 3' Many forests have remnants of the Industrial Revolution.

I'm still working through September 11th

These are pieces I did right after September 11th and in the following year or so.

There are four works in this group that I think of as the four emotional seasons of grappling with the event and all its ramifications to our world.

  • The Mound (seasons 9/11)

    mixed media 5' x 16' x 16' I created 4 pieces that on one level were like 4 seasons of emotions around trying to come to grip with Sept. 11th.
  • Always Fight Fear With Fear (detail)

    wood & copper pipe, 7' x 3' x3' Large cherry tree Y burnt and ripped in half with a chainsaw. Then I inverted it and turned the burnt outside of the tree to the inside and joined it together with beaten used soft copper tubing.
  • Always Fight Fear With Fear

    wood & copper pipe, 7' x 3' x3' Large cherry tree Y burnt and ripped in half with a chainsaw. Then I inverted it and turned the burnt outside of the tree to the inside and joined it together with beaten used soft copper tubing.
  • Tolerence (seasons 9/11)

    burnt wood & white pigment, 6' x 8' x 8' I created 4 pieces that on one level were like 4 seasons of emotions around trying to come to grip with Sept. 11th. This is another from that series.. There are a lot of gray areas we just refuse to look at. This is the crown of a tree turned upside down. Half of it was burnt and the other half was covered with white pigment.
  • Without Peace?

    wood, 70" x 30" x 10" This is one of the first pieces I did after Sept. 11th. It's was like a hole being blow through our psyche. The piece leans back cradled in a corner. It needs to be supported. Don't we all need that on some level? I chainsawed out this hole where two large limbs came together, then burnt and charred the hole with fire.
  • The Mound #6

    mixed media 5' x 16' x 16' Right after 911, I was for the first time in my life directed by my art muses to do something I really didn't want to do. I did not see making peace signs as part of my work, but it was clear that that was what I was being told to do. I was not sure where I was going with the peace signs, but I just started in making one after another and threw them in a pile in the studio, eventually the pile or mound started to speak to me. Mounds have their own history. This version is from a one-person show I did in NYC.
  • Who Broke The World? (detail, seasons 9/11)

    wood & copper nails 4' x 4' x 4' I created 4 pieces that on one level were like 4 seasons of emotions around trying to come to grip with Sept. 11th. This is another from that series.. I came to see the thousands of little round heads of the copper nails as prayers covering the wounds of the earth.
  • Who Broke The World? (seasons 9/11)

    wood & copper nails 4' x 4' x 4' I created 4 pieces that on one level were like 4 seasons of emotions around trying to come to grip with Sept. 11th. This is another from that series.. I came to see the thousands of little round heads of the copper nails as prayers covering the wounds of the earth.
  • The Cave ( 2nd view, seasons 9/11)

    wood & used tire treads 5' x 6' x 6' I created 4 pieces that on one level were like 4 seasons of emotions around trying to come to grip with Sept. 11th. This is another from that series. Throughout history caves have sheltered us,though many of us fear them. & used tire treads 5' x 6' x 6' I created 4 seasons of emotions around trying to come to grip with Sept. 11th. This is another from that series. Throughout history caves have sheltered us,though many of us fear them.
  • The Cave (seasons 9/11)

    wood & used tire treads 5' x 6' x 6' I created 4 pieces that on one level were like 4 seasons of emotions around trying to come to grip with Sept. 11th. This is another from that series. Throughout history caves have sheltered us,though many of us fear them.

Collection of Smaller Works

Why don't I throw much away? There many layers to this answer. I see the value in many things we just discard in todays western societies. It just has always seemed natural that instead of throwing something out, meaning putting it into the garbage, where it will be trucked to some landfill to be buried into the ground (this is the out of sight out of mind game we play), I would rather hold onto things so someone else might use it, or some part of it. or at least it might be re-cycled in some fashion or another, or if it can't be used for anything, often it will still have some scrap value. Is that not a better use of these raw materials? Is this not better for the planet?
In this section I share with you the evolution of hundreds of pieces of copper coated wire collected over many years. When I started I had no real idea except to create a sphere from all my old wire. A project like this happens over many years. I start and stop many times, but it is ongoing. Maybe I'm a turtle in some dimension, but slowly over time and many thoughts the pieces comes to life.

  • Divine Circles

    1'x1'x1' copper coated wire At every stage of a piece I stop to take in what is going on. What has happened here? Many pieces are actually a series of pieces that you just keep transforming one into another. This one could have been done at many different points along the way, but I wanted to keep pushing it.
  • Optimism

    wood & copper wire, 7"x 4"x 5"
  • Hope and Reason

    wood and glass, 36"x 8"x 3" This piece of locust was something left from wood I ripped to make a retaining wall over 20 years ago. It hung around and hung around and I'm not sure why, but it did. What I mean by this is that very easily it could have gotten used in any number of projects around here, but it did not and eventually we developed a rapport. I then knew that at some time it would become part of a piece. The bottle has a whole different history. I've lived here for 30 years and have never thrown any bottle away that has shown up here.
  • Wall Mandala (part of the 500 yr, Old Tree series)

    wood & steel, 28"x 28"x 6" Years ago I made a number of outdoor installations using many different woods from the forest where I work. In a way it was cleaning up of the forest of lots of the fallen trees. This was a smaller sketch that gave the feeling of the larger pieces
  • Still Digging Our Own Graves #5

    bronze & steel, 5'x 2'x 2" This is part of a series I started many years ago. The original pieces were made by creating the shovel handles with the top of fallen cedar trees. This second generation is made by tranforming the cedar tree handle into bronze. It is amazing how the bronzing process can pick up every detail from the cedar tree. Often people don't even realize it's not wood.
  • Two Into One

    wood, 18"x 10"x 10" In this study I've joined two crotches together to create one from.
  • Groping For Symmetry

    copper wire & wood, 16"x 16"x 16" I made this crude tetrahedron from chain-sawed wood. Then over a couple of years I wrapped it with used copper wire seaching for some kind of balance. Maybe that what I'm looking for on some level in my life and works, a sense of balance.
  • Ode To Cloy

    wood & copper wire, 8"x 4"x 2" Cloy Gahagan was my grandfather. Each day I grow more like him, though he has been gone for over ten years now.
  • Twins: Form and Function

    wood, 16"x 14"x 6" These were two very different funky rollers that talked me into becoming one piece.

A Collection of Smaller Works

A group of smaller work done over the last few years. Each piece has its own story of genesis. Sometimes they are working sketches for larger ideas, but often they are a way for me to warm up again, a way to start the fires of creativity flowing.

  • History is Never Far Behind

    wood & brass, 14" x 6" x4" This is made from another piece of wood that just kept hanging around my studio. Eventually it was written into a scene. The piece of brass is from an old drain trap. Their marriage is a perfect match.
  • Suffocating The Future

    10"x 10"x 7", wood & zippered plastic bag I took a bag that enclosed a set of new sheets and cut this piece of wood with a crotch in it, so it tightly squeezed into the bag.Then I zipped it shut. It's kind of like seeing leaves in plastic bags which always bugs me each fall. What a waste on so many levels.
  • Something For John Muir

    26"x 10"x 16", wood & rubber sole I was taking a walk in and along a stream near my home. I found this old weathered shoe sole. At the time I was reading a book about John Muir, so I did this little sketch. He walked across the US and was instrumental in awakening our consciousness to the majesty of this vast land and that we need to protect it.
  • Skowhegan

    10"x 8"x 16", wood Everything has a story, a life before your meeting. This was a chunk of old timber that may have been part of a large old growth tree. There was a growth ring in it that showed me that year must have been a tough one. It had weakened the block so that I was able to take a hammer and knock off the two top corners of the piece. I then made a few simple wedges and tapped them in following the weak year ring. It then became a tree once again. It's important to be close to our surrounding.
  • Who Made The Box Anyway? (detail)

    wood & steel, 18" x 11" x 17" I've always collected things that sparked my curiosity, This hand made tray is something I found while rummaging around an old farm with outbuildings slated to be bulldozed down. I've had the box for years and decided to join it with a grouping of small wooden Y's I've been working with. The Y's fit roughly into the square metal pockets in the tray except for one which stands with others, but outside of the box.
  • Who Made The Box Anyway?

    wood & steel, 18" x 11" x 17" I've always collected things that sparked my curiosity, This hand made tray is something I found while rummaging around an old farm with outbuildings slated to be bulldozed down. I've had the box for years and decided to join it with a grouping of small wooden Y's I've been working with. The Y's fit roughly into the square metal pockets in the tray except for one which stands with others, but outside of the box.
  • Never Forget

    wood, leather, & brass, 16"x 4"x 3" When shut, the secret seems safe.
  • Never Forget

    wood, leather, & brass, 16"x 4"x 3" This is a 2x4 used in building many homes. I saved this one many years ago and always knew that someday it would become a piece. Recently, I was cleaning one of my collections out of my home when I came across a bag full of old leather packs and briefcases. I used parts from one of the old briefcases so you can open and shut this piece of wood, which was once a tree, that was then cut into a 2x4. The 2x4 still has that tree energy very much alive in it. When you buckle shut the straps this story is kept safe.
  • Come Together

    9"x 9"x 4", iron & wood In this piece I've used another of the natural wooden junctions or points of convergence that I have been drawn to for years. I call them Y's. In this sketch I've shape a Y so that it fits tightly into this old iron band which was used for the hub of a old wooden wagon wheel. I heated the iron band to expand it before the final fitting of the Y, so as the iron cooled, it tightened around the wood.
  • Consuming Never Works

    wood, 7"x 6"x 6" Cross-cuts of different cedar limbs stacked together to create this form

Wrapping & Bindings

Creating forms through wrapping and binding.

  • Looking East

    vines & steel wire, 5' x 5' x 6' I saw old wire cages stacked as I drove by a farm. I then took my old tomato cages and made this triangular stack with the vision of interweaving the wild fox grapevines to create this relationship. I was pulling them from the tree in the area that was to become my home. From a distance the sphere seemed to rotate and hover.
  • My Line Is Old (detail)

    old fire hose, 21" x 24" x 4" One old fire hose that is wrapped in such a way that it represents the three basic shapes in nature.
  • My Line Is Old

    old fire hose, 21" x 24" x 4" One old fire hose that is wrapped in such a way that it represents the three basic shapes in nature.
  • Compressing the Centuries

    wood & copper wire, 3" x 2" x 2" Copper wire wrapped tightly around a short cedar limb, which was then soaked and beaten repeatedly, smashing and breaking the fibers of wood. How does one capture the weight of a century?
  • We Are One

    wood & copper wire, 12"x 12"x 4" Is the copper wire wedge joining or holding the spilt Y apart or together? What holds us apart or together?
  • Frustration to Creation

    wood & copper, 24"x6"x6" This is made from a piece of locust wood that one evening in a moment of anger I slammed against an old log many times. I did this so I didn't direct my anger at those I love. A few days later I happened to look at this piece of wood and saw how my beating of the wood had split it into 4 quarters. There was some thing in this that spoke to me.
  • Impasse

    tree & vines 40' x 5' x 5' This is a piece I created after discovering a 19th century road on my property. These vine wrappings came about while I was a young man clearing my land and owning my artistry. I cleared this old road way over the course of a year, but left one tree in the middle of it. Then I wrapped and wove this 5' ball of vines through and around the crotch of the tree. I now had a road, but there was an impasse meaning it couldn't be used after all that work.
  • Western Logic

    wood & copper, 24" x 24" x 18" This sculpture was done at the turn of the century. It is 2,000 feet of copper wire tightly wrapped around a cross section from an old locust tree. I then made a locust wood spike and beat it through the center of the wire and the hollow part of the cross section of the old locust tree. I like the tension between the copper wire and wood, the tension between the 20th & 21st centuries.
  • Don't Give Up

    string 12" x 8" x 8" This is all the string that was being thrown away from one of the 1st day projects in a 3-D class I taught. I untangled and tied all the string pieces together. Then I wound them around a small armature until they slowly started to transform into this egg type form.

Why I Finally Gave In To Working With Copper Pipe, Wire, & Nails.

Many projects using old and re-cycled copper pipe and other types of collected used copper things.

  • Why Not Care? (detail)

    wood & copper nails, 7' x 3' x 1' This piece was created by searching out this Y from a fallen cherry tree. Starting at a chosen point on each limb, copper roofing nails were driven in. Each nail touched another in a continuous spiral up the limb untill they converged at the crotch and continued on to the top of the trunk. The small copper circles form this almost fish scale surface covering the wood.
  • Why Not Care?

    wood & copper nails, 7' x 3' x 1' This piece was created by searching out this Y from a fallen cherry tree. Starting at a chosen point on each limb, copper roofing nails were driven in. Each nail touched another in a continuous spiral up the limb untill they converged at the crotch and continued on to the top of the trunk. The small copper circles form this almost fish scale surface covering the wood.
  • Face The Storm

    wood & copper pipe, 9' x 2' x 1', I love the Ys of trees. By turning them upside down, the two limbs rise up to bocome one. This is a locust Y with a canoe type gouge in each leg.(ritual scars) One has been charred with fire and the other has soft copper pipe drilled and beaten into it. I once heard a story about how the plains buffalo would slowly walk into a blizzards to stay alive.They faced the storm. In the spring of 2001 when I was making this piece I wondered if we had the courage to face our on coming storms.
  • No Boundaries

    wood & copper nails, 6"x 12"x 12", This piece was a practice sketch for the large hanging piece called "Who Broke The World?" It was the first time I used the copper nails as a visual component in a piece. This is the crotch from a big limb that I've rounded off, so if you turned it upside down it would fit in a large bowl. Then I started driving nails in the center of each of the 3 cut off parts of the crotch, (where the limbs join).
  • Working for a History (detail of top)

    wood & soft copper pipe, 40"x 18"x 18" Up to this point I had subconsciously not worked with copper pipe for it was just too closely related to my family and their plumbing livelihood . Before that moment I still needed some level of separation. For this piece I took 9 old porch posts and joined them together to create a mass, then rounded off the top so the form looked worn down. Next I figured out through trial and error how to get the copper pipe to become one with the wood. I came up with process of drilling holes into the wood and then driving the pipe in.
  • Working for a History

    wood & soft copper pipe, 40"x 18"x 18" Up to this point I had subconsciously not worked with copper pipe for it was just too closely related to my family and their plumbing livelihood . Before that moment I still needed some level of separation. For this piece I took 9 old porch posts and joined them together to create a mass, then rounded off the top so the form looked worn down. Next I figured out through trial and error how to get the copper pipe to become one with the wood. I came up with process of drilling holes into the wood and then driving the pipe in.
  • Everyone Has a Well

    copper 6' x 9" x 3" Many layers of heated copper wire are wrapped around a ladder made from copper pipe. The wire contracts and tightens as it cools. Sometimes we all just need a little help to see the light.
  • Future Past

    wood & beaten copper pipe, 7'x 2'x 2' This weathered locust wood tripod stood in one of my gardens for years until I had the vision for this piece.I brought it into my old studio which had just about a 7' tall ceiling. (That's why in that period my large indoor pieces all ended up being about 7' tall.) To make the copper sphere, I started beating 3/4" soft copper pipe flat, then came up with a way to wrap and weave and beat it into a 70 lb solid copper ball.
  • What Makes Us Human? (detail)

    wood & copper pipe, 78"x 28"x 6" Often I come up with an idea and then it may take months or years to find the right piece of wood to make the piece come alive. This sculpture started with an old piece of copper pipe that I put a branched piece of wood into.Then I could not find another branched piece that fit as snugly as the first. I set it aside to work on another sculpture, but often checked on other pieces of wood to see if one might fit.. Then after a year or so I found the right one.
  • What Makes Us Human?

    wood & copper pipe, 78"x 28"x 6" Often I come up with an idea and then it may take months or years to find the right piece of wood to make the piece come alive. This sculpture started with an old piece of copper pipe that I put a branched piece of wood into.Then I could not find another branched piece that fit as snugly as the first. I set it aside to work on another sculpture, but often checked on other pieces of wood to see if one might fit.. Then after a year or so I found the right one.

Where would we be without WATER?

Water Wars Project: Physical forms as a dialogue. We can't live without fresh water.

The 3 human-sized cairn or egg forms "Synergy", "Water Wars #2", and "The Golden Egg"
are the most recent works in this series. They are made to stand alone, but I see them as some kind of trinity. I see them like the three blind mice and the three monkeys who see no evil, hear no evil, and speak no evil, and the three wise men all wrapped up into one.

I've also included a few pieces from 20 years ago where I first wrestled with water and our connections to it.

  • Society #3 (detail)

    water, wood, rope,& rubber, 7' x 7' x 7' a installation from 1990 Water is hard to control. For this piece to stand it took a multitude of different forces and support systems to come to life. A network A web It became about our inter-connectedness. Who knew these simple crude materials could transform into this. Certainly not I when I began this project. Follow your creativity for it is pregnant with whole new worlds we have yet to discover.
  • Society #4 in the woods

    water, wood, rope,& rubber, 7' x 7' x 7' & the forest This version of "Society" was set in a forest glen where it lived for a couple of years. After many hard rains and ice and probably some uv deterioration on the used rubber liner (the liner had been used to line a solar storage tank in the 80's) it ripped and collapsed. It was beautiful when in the winter the rain water that had collected turned to a solid chunk of ice.
  • Water Wars #1

    Old garden hoses tightly wrapped into a sphere. 2' x 2' x 2' The first of the Water Wars Projects. I always loved rolling up big snowballs.
  • Golden Egg #2 (part of the; Water Wars series)

    re-cycled tire treads .5' x 3' x 3' Many layers of used tire treads wrapped around an old small fiberglass water tank to create an egg or cocoon type of form. This piece is part of the Water Wars series. The tires are symbolic, for me, of oil and the Industrial Revolution. Oil is part of the root of the many power struggles today, but the real liquid gold of today and the future is fresh water and it will be though the power of oil that it will be controlled.
  • Water Wars #2 (detail)

    Old garden hoses wrapped in and around a crude copper armature to from a cairn or egg like form. 6' x 3' x 3'
  • Water Wars #2 (part of the Water Wars series)

    Old garden hoses wrapped in and around a crude copper armature to from a cairn or egg like form. 6' x 3' x 3 Here in America some of us use water like it will always magically be there. Many people just don't think about it. Fresh water in the world is dwindling at a rapid pace. If 100 years ago we had started being more conscientious about how and what we did with our fresh water we might not be in this situation.
  • Synergy (detail)

    used copper fittings & pipe, 70" x 44" x 44" My brother knew I'd been sick for along time and called to tell me that the price of scrap copper was higher then it had ever been, so one day I walked up to the studio with the intention of gathering the copper for recycling to bring in a little cash. It only took moments for me to realize that there was to much history in these old pipes and fittings to recycle in that manner. Thus started the 3 year project to create this sculpture now known as "Synergy" Many memories merging to make a difference.
  • Synergy (part of the Water Wars series)

    used copper fittings & pipe, 70" x 44" x 44" My brother knew I'd been sick for along time and called to tell me that the price of scrap copper was higher then it had ever been, so one day I walked up to the studio with the intention of gathering the copper for recycling to bring in a little cash. It only took moments for me to realize that there was to much history in these old pipes and fittings to recycle in that manner. Thus started the 3 year project to create this sculpture now known as "Synergy" Many memories merging to make a difference.

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About Brent

I grew up the son of a plumber in Harford County,Maryland. At twenty-four, I purchased 20 acres of undeveloped forest. It was there that I started trusting my intuition and allowed myself to play with the materials of the forest. It was there that I became an artist. Within a year or so, I started taking... more

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