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About Leah

Leah Cooper is a Baltimore artist who is captivated by the everyday. Her focus often narrows to the smallest of cracks on the sidewalk and the faintest of shadows on the wall. Using contextually dependent installation she explores an expanded notion of drawing that questions where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. She is an avid observer, a determined thinker, a purposeful maker, and an artist who designates a piece successful when it has generated more questions... more

a narrow gate

'a narrow gate'

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world?

In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece?

Drawing the Undifferientiated

VisArts
Rockville, Md

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world?

In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece?

site drawing_ size & scale

'site drawing_ size & scale'
Montpelier Art Center
Laurel, Md

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world? In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece? And if so, could the experience extend beyond the act of participation and prompt the viewer to begin to see their once familiar surroundings in a new way?

projection room

'projection room'
Leidy Gallery
Baltimore, Md

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world? In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece? And if so, could the experience extend beyond the act of participation and prompt the viewer to begin to see their once familiar surroundings in a new way?

Iterated, Gallery 4-Part A

Sondheim Finalist Exhibition
Baltimore Museum of Art

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world?

In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece?

  • installation_detail 1

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • gallery view

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • installation detail

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • gallery view

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • installation detail

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • installation detail

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • installation detail

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • gallery view

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • installation detail

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements
  • gallery view

    materials include tape, mirror, graphite, graphite/relief drawings on masonite, and existing site elements

iterating the ordinary

Meyerhoff Gallery, MICA
Baltimore, Md

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world?

In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece?

In Response

Stamp Gallery
University of Maryland
College Park, Md

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world?

In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece?

Indexical drawings

June/July 2013
ART342 Residency
Ft Collins, CO

I work outside the conventional notion of drawing, notating a physical site rather than rendering an illusory version of that site. Drawing is traditionally considered to be a two-dimensional re-presentation of the three-dimensional. What if drawing were liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead employed as a strategy where tactics might include nomination and notation; where materials move outside of standard mark makers and paper. Thus a line drawn by the artist is equivalent to a line created by an existing site element, something as ordinary as a visible drywall seam.

Through these site responsive drawings I examine where the liminal state exists between what is noticed and what is overlooked. If all facts are physiologically recorded but much of what we see goes unnoticed, is what we see more a result of how we have edited reality? And if so, how does the introduction of additional information begin to disassemble the gestalt and alter our perception or knowledge of the world?

In addition to perceptibility, I am interested in employing the contextually dependent nature of my drawings as a means to encourage the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object creates a heuristic state that asks the viewer to complete the piece?

Notation drawings

ART342 Residency
June/July 2012
Ft Collins, CO

I employ drawing as a strategy to investigate the influence of visual information on a viewer?s subjective perception of object and place. I work outside the traditional notion of drawing, nominating rather than rendering a variable framework of information. Traditionally drawing is considered to be a two-dimensional representation of the three-dimensional. Most often it is a depiction that is once removed from the experience of the object or place it describes. What if drawing was liberated from its conventional role of descriptor and instead was employed as a strategy whose tactics might include, nomination, illustration, and notation and a strategy where materials could move beyond the standard mark makers and paper. Within this context, two dimensions would no longer be the boundary that defines drawing.

The resulting installations are contextually dependent and ask the viewer to engage as participant rather than observer. My interest in audience as contributor leads me to question the hierarchy of the art object. Is it possible to create work where meaning is not contained within the object, but rather the object aims to create a heuristic state of affairs; asking the viewer to complete the piece.

Connect with Leah

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Leah's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.